The Emerging Trans-Red Sea Cooperation and Solutions to the Region’s Security Problems

Prof. Redie Bereketeab
Language
English
Abstract

The Emerging Trans-Red Sea Cooperation and Solutions to the Region’s Security Problems
Redie Bereketeab

Abstract
The paper examines the emerging trans-Red Sea cooperation and its implication to peace, security and development. The trans-Red Sea region has always been closely connected. Historical, cultural, religious, social, migratory, and geographic commonalities embed the close connection the region enjoys. In recent years, the relationship has further been enhanced by conflicts, fundamentalism, extremism, radicalism, terrorism and piracy afflicting both sides of the Red Sea. It has thus become common to talk about trans-Red Sea security architecture. The evolvement of trans-Red Sea security architecture requires evolvement of corresponding infrastructures that bolster grappling with those convoluted problems. The emerging trans-Red Sea cooperation is therefore a necessary development dictated by the complex problems the region is facing. Regional cooperation intended to deal with regional problems would certainly boost physical, mental and demographic capacity of the region that render extra-regional intervention redundant. A formalised and institutionalised cooperation among states on both sides of the Red Sea could preferably involve the Inter-Governmental Authority on Development (IGAD) and the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) and other affected actors. Such configuration could: (i) provide regional solutions for regional problems, (ii) stem extra-regional interventions, (iii) lead to socio-economic development, (iv) empower the region.