Party Finance Systems, Quality of Governance, and Public Trust: Evidence from Asian Democracies

Dr. Don Lee
Language
English
Abstract

Distribution of political resources such as party funds is essential in the effective functioning of representative democracy. Yet, most research on this subject tends to focus on the level of corruption as an outcome variable. We attempt to expand a scope of this agenda by addressing the following question: How does the pattern of allocating and regulating party funds result in the quality of representative democracy and public trust toward parties? We first analyze novel data on party finance systems in Asia, the understudied region in this subject, to understand their impact on the level of corruption as an empirical contribution. Then we further look into their impact on other measures of quality of governance such as women's representation in parliament as well as public trust toward political parties. By highlighting Asia, where the comprehensiveness of political finance systems and the level of implementation vary significantly across countries, we illuminate the mechanism of how a type of party finance system affects the quality of representative democracy and public trust toward parties as political institutions.