Regulating Foreign Electoral 'Interference': Reform in Australasia

Prof. Graeme Orr
Language
English
Abstract

'No man is an island, entire of itself' (Donne). But what of island nations and their elections? National elections are chauvinistic events; but politics is necessarily porous.
Amidst an outbreak of interest and concern about foreign interference in electoral politics worldwide, this paper will examine the experience and position of two island-nations, Australia and New Zealand. Once cocooned on the south-western edge of the Pacific, both nations were once quite sanguine about influence from within the British Empire of which they were a part. But in recent years, each has moved to erect limits on foreign political donations in particular. Are these laws more than window-dressing? And how have they incubated and been received, particularly in the context of the rise of China as both adominant trading partner and regional superpower.

This presentation is based on a paper by Professor Graeme Orr (University of Queensland, Australia) and Professor Andrew Geddis (University of Otago, New Zealand) which is part of a forthcoming Election Law Journal special issue on foreign election interference and national responses.